34th Annual Pacific Rim International Conference on Disability and Diversity

Captioned Media: Responsibility, Policies, & Strategies, Tia Ivanko & Lauren Kinast; March 4, 2019

Presentation Summary: Captioned media has become a topic of focus for postsecondary institutions due to the increased technology demands including archived lecture videos, pre-recorded lectures for online courses, and online media content used in the classroom. This poster presentation will provide a framework for institutions to approach the increasing demands for captioned media, including models of captioning and strategies to streamline the process.


Community Conversations: Mobilizing Local Communities to Make Change Happen, Carrie Lou Garberoglio & Diego Guerra; March 5, 2019

Presentation Summary:  This presentation is an overview of the NDC community model, Engage for Change | local, and the key ideas and solutions that have emerged in conversations across the nation. The National Deaf Center (NDC) believes that the path to improved outcomes includes actively involving the communities surrounding deaf youth. To achieve this goal, NDC has a framework for community networks to leverage social capital available at the local level, starting with community conversations. This model invites community members into the process of identifying critical needs and potential solutions, thus increasing buy-in and the chance for successful impact on improved postsecondary outcomes.


Disability Service Professional’s Guide to Deaf Services: Evidence, Strategies, and Tools for Implementation, Tia Ivanko & Lauren Kinast; March 5, 2019

Presentation Summary:  This presentation will introduce a series of resources, “a toolkit”, for disability service providers to draw from as they navigate accommodations and auxiliary services for deaf students. Presenters will guide participants through standard practices and offer a framework for both novice and experienced providers can add to professional repertoire.


Presenters


Carrie Lou Garberoglio, PhD

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she/her/hers
@carrie1ou

As a deaf person who grew up in the deaf community, Dr. Carrie Lou Garberoglio’s professional expertise is steeped in her lived experience.

A nationally-recognized educational researcher, she is an Assistant Professor of Practice in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy at UT Austin. She also directs the National Deaf Center on Postsecondary Outcomes and is the principal investigator for the federally funded grant. Working in tandem with Associate Director Tia Ivanko, MA, NIC, to manage the organization, Dr. Garberoglio oversees the center’s research, community and government engagement, and outreach initiatives.

Her motivation for her work is deeply personal, and largely driven by the desire to center deaf people in decision-making that makes an impact on everyday lives. Dr. Garberoglio’s work seeks to counter commonly held narratives about deaf people that are built on a deficit perspective. She advocates for examining the deficits within systems, then changing the systems — not the people.

In her work, Dr. Garberoglio strives to reach a more nuanced understanding of the development of deaf people throughout the life cycle, particularly in the adolescent and young adult period, and how that development is significantly affected by psychosocial factors and systemic barriers. She seeks to provide the field with current and accurate data about deaf people that places outcome data within appropriate contexts, through secondary analyses of large-scale federal datasets.

Her research into the critical transition period after high school for deaf people is also the topic of Shifting the Dialog, Shifting the Culture: Pathways to Successful Postsecondary Outcomes for Deaf Individuals, the critically acclaimed book Dr. Garberoglio co-authored in 2017 with NDC Founding Director Stephanie W. Cawthon, PhD. They also co-authored Research in Deaf Education: Contexts, Challenges and Considerations in 2017 to increase research rigor in work that involves deaf communities.

As an early-career deaf scholar, she is part of the current movement of deaf academics who are stepping up to take the mic, demanding a seat at the table, and forging new paths through academia.

Dr. Garberoglio has authored over 25 scholarly publications and numerous technical and evaluation reports, and presents regularly at conferences. She is committed to increasing the accessibility of research for deaf audiences, using American Sign Language (ASL) to translate and disseminate complex academic content. She also teaches research methods and statistics coursework at the University of Northern Colorado.

As a child of deaf parents who were also educators in the deaf education system, Dr. Garberoglio’s first language was ASL, and dinner conversations revolved around teaching and school systems. She attended one of the largest state schools for the deaf in the nation. She was also mainstreamed for part of the school day from 3rd to 9th grade, where she used ASL interpreters and navigated systems that were not fully accessible in terms of social interactions — an unfortunately common experience for many deaf students in mainstream U.S. schools.

Dr. Garberoglio earned two master’s degrees, the first in Deaf Education and Deaf Studies from Lamar University, and the second in Program Evaluation from The University of Texas at Austin. She has a PhD in Educational Psychology at The University of Texas at Austin.

An avid gardener and home cook, Carrie Lou lives in Austin and enjoys reading, camping, and traveling with her two daughters and partner Lizzie.

Current Affiliations and Appointments

  • Assistant Professor of Practice | Department of Educational Leadership and Policy at the University of Texas at Austin

  • Project Manager | Meadows Center for Preventing Educational Risk at the University of Texas at Austin

  • Instructor | Department of ASL & Interpreting Studies at the College of Education & Behavioral Sciences at the University of Northern Colorado

  • Evaluator | Deaf STEM Community Alliance

  • Associate Editor | Journal of American Sign Language and Literature

  • Review Board Member | Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education

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Diego Guerra

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Diego Guerra is passionate about community engagement. As the coordinator, Diego is responsible for Engage for Change | local, a community model that brings people together to promote stronger networks within local communities, which leads to quality access, services and resources for deaf individuals. Diego holds a bachelor’s degree in history from The University of Texas at Austin.

Tia Ivanko, MA, NIC, ADAC

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she/her/hers
@TiaIvanko

Tia is an educator who is passionate about creating equitable educational experiences for deaf people and increasing the professional capacity of the people who teach and support them.

As Associate Director and Co-Principal Investigator at the National Deaf Center on Postsecondary Outcomes (NDC), Tia works in close tandem with Director Carrie Lou Garberoglio, PhD, to manage the organization, in particular leading eLearning initiatives, the Help team and technical assistance services, staff development, and project workflows.

She draws upon her extensive professional expertise, community experiences, and personal interest in diversity, inclusion, and equity to promote NDC’s mission of #DeafSuccess.

A nationally certified interpreter (NIC), Tia brings a deep knowledge of accessibility and professional practices in the interpreting field to her work. In addition to teaching and mentoring interpreters working in education settings, she has a special interest in removing barriers and biases that people of color encounter as consumers of and professionals in the interpreting field.

Tia was also recently certified as an ADA Coordinator (ADAC), demonstrating her mastery to oversee and coordinate compliance with the American with Disabilities Act (ADA) and provide professional support to others.

For seven years, Tia has worked under this federal funding line for technical assistance and dissemination, concentrating on accommodation and accessibility practices, resource development, and innovative professional development for practitioners in the field. Before joining the grant, she worked as a deaf services coordinator, collegiate program director, and a teacher of the deaf.

Raised on the east coast and now living in Texas, Tia has been connected with deaf people since her childhood. She earned her master’s degree in Deaf Education from Western Maryland College and her bachelor’s degree from Ithaca College. When she is not working, you will likely find Tia trying to convince her two children to play a board game, make a craft, or hike one of Austin’s many trails to savor life’s moments that fade all too fast.

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Lore Kinast, EdD

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Dr. Lore Kinast is a change agent working to address accessibility barriers that deaf students face in higher education settings. Her interest in education and employment access for deaf people initially began when she worked as an employment development specialist and experienced the struggles her deaf clients endured with finding a job. It was further propelled while managing programs and coordinating services including interpreting, captioning, and other accommodations for deaf students at several colleges. She has spent over 25 years collaborating with stakeholders on all levels, designing accessible opportunities using short and long term goals, implementing systemic benchmarks, and spearheading program development projects. Currently, Lore is the Co-Chair for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Knowledge and Practice Community with the Association on Higher Education and Disability (AHEAD). She received her master’s degree from California State University, Northridge in Educational Administration, and an EdD in Higher Education Administration from Texas Tech University.