New Live Presentation: Centralized System Presentation

Work Based Learning Supports #DeafSuccess

What student doesn’t want to be more independent, take a break from the classroom, and potentially earn their own money? With Work Based Learning (WBL) programs, students can do all three, while also learning valuable job, social, and life skills that they can use throughout their future.

New Live Panel: Behind the scenes of Deafverse

The Benefits of Mentoring

“Show me a successful individual, and I’ll show you someone who had real positive influences in his or her life.” — Denzel Washington

Mentoring is a valuable opportunity for anyone — but it is particularly impactful for deaf youth. Mentoring opportunities offer valuable experiences that contribute to personal, academic, and career development for deaf youth.

NDC Secures Second OSEP Grant for Another Five Years of Funding

Professional Development Spotlight: Back to Basics for Fall

It has been quite the tumultuous year, with ever-changing policies and educational settings. Virtual learning and finding new accommodations for new situations have been challenging for students, families, faculty, and disability services staff. Now more than ever, starting a new school year can be exciting, yet also uncertain for your deaf students.

Free, Online Professional Development for ASL Interpreters

Sign language interpreting is a highly complex and essential service that eases communication for deaf and hearing people alike. Interpreters have a variety of skills, knowledge, and experience, and are constantly learning to ensure they remain effective. Their professional development shouldn’t have to be complicated or expensive, and should keep deaf people’s experience at the forefront.

Attitudes and Biases as Barriers for Deaf People: New Online Course Explores Their Impact and Ways to Take Action

Learn How to Engage Deaf Communities in New Online Course

Live Panel December 8: The Power of Community: Centering Deaf People in Decision Making

The lived experience and knowledge of deaf community members must guide policy changes, strategic planning, and programs that are designed to reduce barriers and increase opportunities for deaf people in the United States. In reality, however, this is seldom the case. Decisions are made for, and on behalf of, deaf people without involving them every day.

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